Somos uno. Somos dos.

Somos uno. Somos dos.
Lucia Peluffo
Available here

somos

Somos uno. Somos dos.
¿Estamos solos?
¿Entendemos?
Estamos juntos.
¿Nos entienden?
Lenguage verbal, lenguage visual…
Al final, ¿estamos juntos?

We are one. We are two.
Are we alone?
Do we understand?
We are together.
Are we understood?
Verbal communication, visual communication.
In the end, are we together?

 

La soledad muchas veces es una elección.
Ese viaje a la tranquilidad.
Una abstracción/separación de la realidad, sin influencias.
Así uno elige el “qué” y el “cómo”,
respecto al ver, al estar, al hacer, al amar, al sentir, al elegir…

¿Qué pasa cuando uno elige una soledad de a dos?
Dos personas que son uno y que se van juntos,
y ese uno está solo.
Pero son dos.
Dos que hacen algo nuevo de ese otro que ya no es uno.
Que dejó de ser uno ese día que encontró al dos.

Loneliness is sometimes something that we choose.
That journey to tranquility.
An abstraction/separation from reality, with no influences..
Like that, one can choose the “what” and the “how”,
Related to his seeing, being, doing, loving, feeling, and choosing.

What happens when we choose a two people loneliness?
Two that are one, and that leave together,
And that one is alone.
But they are two
Two that make something new out of the other that is no longer one,
That stopped being one the day they found two.

Emergence / Landscape Sublime

Emergence (In ‘The In-Between: Journal of Digital Imaging Artists)
Mark Dorf
Available here

Landscape Sublime(In ‘The In-Between: Journal of Digital Imaging Artists)
Anastasia Samoylova
Available here 

inbetween

Emergence is the debut book-work by Brooklyn artist Mark Dorf, as well as the introductory volume of In the In-Between Editions, a limited edition book series that features artist portfolios and accompanying essays.

Mark Dorf’s series Emergence utilizes photography and digital media to scrutinize ideas of landscape, sublimity, and scientific inquiry within the context of our data-driven information age.  In this work, Dorf adopts the classical genre of landscape as a point of departure to analyze how new media technologies have significantly altered the ways in which we understand and think about the natural world.

“Our explanations tend towards the smooth and the orderly, a reflection of Plato’s conception of the world as the product of divine craftsman. InEmergence, Dorf implicates the “larger puzzle,” the development from the fragile, social foundations of natural science, where objectivity is but a fragile myth of authority, into its application the throes of ubiquitous technology.”

-Excerpt from The Data Fields of Mark Dorf, by Mike Pepi

 

Landscape Sublime is the debut book-work by Anastasia Samoylova, and the second volume of In the In-Between Editions, a limited edition book series that pairs exceptional photographic projects with essays by emerging arts writers. Vol. I, Emergence by Mark Dorf, was published in October 2015.

Anastasia Samoylova (b.1984) was born and raised in Moscow, received an MA in interior design from Russian State University, and an MFA from Bradley University. By utilizing tools and strategies related to digital media and commercial photography, her work interrogates notions of environmentalism, consumerism and the picturesque. Samoylova’s work participates in the landscape photography tradition while scrutinizing the consumable products it generates.

“The sublime is colonial in its central conflict about the appropriation of beauty and the conquering of nature, but also in its orientation toward the mother market. The picturesque lubricates consumerism, disseminated in the modern period on paper media, flat and shiny, and in plastics of mass appeal. The formally elaborate installations in Landscape Sublime are a material reminder that photographic saturation means contending with all that the image takes and leaves for dead.”

From Ecoterminal Aesthetics: 7 Premises, by Stephanie Amon

Pasado mañana II

Pasado mañana II
Manuel A. Fernández
Available here

aftertomorrow

After tomorrow II (Pasado mañana II) are postcards of an impossible time. Manuel images offer us another time, neither past nor future, but the new images. It does not matter where they come from. Because they are part of our visual universal heritage, our way of knowing the world in pictures. Image as fertile ground for imagination.

 

 

Castles and Islands

Castles and Islands
Joshua Edwards
Available here

castles

Castles and Islands is an ongoing photography and poetry project by Joshua Edwards.

An exhibition catalog that doubles as a collection of photographs and poems, Castles and Islands, was published in early 2016 by Liang Editions. Work from the project is the subject of exhibitions at Rice University (spring 2016) and the University of Arizona Poetry Center (spring 2017). Giapan was published as a zine by Antler Press in 2014 and Valley of Unrest was included in Imperial Nostalgias, a poetry collection published by Ugly Duckling Presse in 2013. Formosa is available at Marfa Book Company and Treatment of the Dead is forthcoming in late 2016. This work is related to another multidisciplinary project, Architecture for Travelers, and its two books: Photographs Taken at One-Hour Intervals During a Walk from Galveston Island to the West Texas Town of Marfa and Architecture for Travelers (both published by Edition Solitude).

The Nature of Imitation

The Nature of Imitation
Yola Monakhov Stockton
Available here

nature_of_imitation

“Looking closely at birds in the fields through the materials of colour film and studio props, The Nature of Imitation considers the physical and metaphorical qualities of the landscape. Like natural history drawings, the photographs reimagine traditions of landscape representation from Renaissance tapestries, the early history of photography, and Modernist painting and sculpture. Collaborating with scientists and naturalists in Massachusetts, New York and Costa Rica, Monakhov Stockton gained access to wild birds caught for banding and release, and those captive in labs. Alongside photographs made in woods, orchards, and gardens, the work cultivates a vocabulary of techniques that attend to the process of picture-making and the emotions and ethics of looking at other creatures.”

Gardening at Night

Gardening at Night
Cig Harvey
Available here

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“Gardening At Night is an exploration of home, family, nature, and time. It’s predecessor, You Look At Me Like An Emergency captured journeys in finding and defining home, while Gardening At Night denotes settling into one’s landscape, and creating life where you are. The narrative throughout has a delicious element of magical realism – the viewer is left with the feeling of waking within a dream. On the other hand there is a familiarity in what she evokes – something primal and instinctual that points to each person’s connection to nature. Seasons feature prominently as metaphors for the cycle of life, and interplays between shadow and light underscore the work. Each photograph and written vignette offers a tactile experience of things that ordinarily seem intangible – the secret life of birds, of barren winter trees, of the lake in spring time, or the girl in the window whose house you pass every day. The jewel-toned images are arresting and weighted, but punctuated as always by Cig’s characteristic whimsical style. The result is an intensely personal collection that captures an experience of the world that is at once otherworldly and yet instantly familiar.”

 

Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Emptiness, Tokyo Landscape

Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Emptiness; Tokyo Landscape
William Ash
Available here

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“Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Emptiness is a homage to a city William Ash called home for ten years. Returning to Tokyo in 2014, Ash captured an intimate portrait of this complex metropolis. Starting from the simple question of what is the natural landscape of Tokyo, Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Emptiness reveals the layers in both space and time that make up one of the most artificial topographies in the world. The images weave a beautiful and quiet narrative of this remarkable city. 80 color photographs, 1 illustration, text in English and Japanese, 96 pages, 8.5″x11″. For more information on this book, visit here.

 

Hide

Hide
Jason Vaughn
Available here 

hide

“hide
is a project that began as a commentary on Wisconsin’s hunting tradition, using deer stands as a metaphor for the changing values of the sport.  When my sudden cancer diagnosis interrupted the project, hide took on a much deeper, more personal meaning.

I was inspired on my drives through Wisconsin by deer stands, and began having conversations with hunters about the tradition of hunting in their families.  Some people described building the stands as something permanent that could be passed to the next generation, especially sons who would inherit the land.  I was anticipating the birth of my own son and thinking about my legacy to him, so this idea resonated strongly with me.  I also heard hunters emphasize that their pastime is not about violence, but more about oneness with nature and time spent with their children in the stands.  I wanted these photographs to capture the serenity of that sentiment, and to suggest the dignity that was associated with hunting when it was seen as a means of feeding large families.  Finally, I wanted to look at the issue from a historical standpoint, and the impermanent nature of some of the stands illustrates the fading hunting tradition in Wisconsin, which has declined in recent years.

When I was diagnosed with leukemia in 2011, my work on hide was put on hold.  I was 32 years old and had a 3-month-old baby at home.  Having to face mortality so unexpectedly made me come back to the project with a new perspective on the ideas of permanence and impermanence.  Ultimately, hide became my reflection on legacies and family, my homage to the state that has become my home, and a narrative about accepting change.”

In Vino Veritas

In Vino Veritas
Wideyed Photography Collective
Available here

In Vino Veritas Smaller

“Wideyed is a photography collective based in the North East of England. Founded in 2008 by Lucy Carolan, Richard Glynn and Louise Taylor, the group is dedicated to creating and curating works for exhibition and publication in the UK and beyond.”

In Vino Veritas is a collective project following organic wine production in France.

“Since ancient times, it’s been considered that wine reliably reveals a person’s character. For experimental natural wine producer François Blanchardin vino veritas means remaining true to the character of the grape, respecting the integrity of this very complex fruit and skilfully drawing out its subtle aromas.

Each year the grapes are picked and pressed by hand and foot. The harvest is labour intensive, but also a festive event, with families, friends, musicians and artists from all around France and beyond coming together to make and celebrate wine.

Wideyed photographers Lucy Carolan, Richard Glynn and Louise Taylor took part in the 2010 and 2011 harvests as artists-in-residence at the Blanchard domaine of Château du Perron in the Touraine region of France. Their responses to the wine and way of life they experienced there have matured into In Vino Veritas.

The newsprint publication was produced to accompany the exhibition ‘In Vino Veritas’, first shown at ArtHouse, London May 2012 and subsequently at Espace Beaujon, for Mois de la Photo OFF, Paris November 2012.”

Shoot!

Shoot!
Louise Taylor
Available here

Shoot! Smaller

“Shoot! is a documentary project initiated in 2008. It follows a small pheasant and partridge shooting syndicate in Tow Law, County Durham on both work and shoot days. The shooting season (for pheasant) runs from October – February but creates a unique year round social space as members share the cost and labour of preparing for the season. During the closed season this involves ongoing woodland management and rearing game birds for release.

Participants are extremely diverse, and are drawn from rural and urban areas, young and old, men and women, and people from a diverse range of cultural, educational and occupational backgrounds. Whilst the final objective is to try one’s skill in actually shooting ‘sporting’ game birds, the process constructs a much larger social space for male and female sociability, for passing on traditions and sharing country lore and living practices.

The book was created to accompany the exhibition, ‘SHOOT!’ installed at Durham Art Gallery as part of The Social: Encountering Photography, a celebration of photography in North East England.”

Menq Enq Mer Sarere

Menq Enq Mer Sarere
Published by Orpheus Standing Alone
Available here

Menq Enq Mer Sarere Smaller

“Menq Enq Mer Sarere is a collection of works that chant an ode to memory.
Collages, photographs, poems intertwined seek a new way to think our memory.
As something intrinsic and ever-lasting, a memory for which no recollection is necessary.
These works have purposely been produced in commemoration of the Armenian Genocide (1915 ♢ 2015)”

This collection is accompanied by 52 minutes of field recording, recorded in Armenia and Georgia in January 2015 which can be found here.

 

 

Tank Batteries

Tank Batteries
Nathan Pearce
Available here

Tank Batteries Smaller

“These photographs of tank batteries were all made within a few miles of my front door in Southern Illinois. There are a handful of photos here but there could very well be hungarian tank batteries overwhelm the landscape here. They are a reminder of Both the previous oil booms que have come and gone here and the rumored impending oil boom que has yet to materialize.”

One Year On Kytherea

One Year On Kytherea
Kristina Williamson
Available here

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“One Year on Kythera
 is a photographic documentary of the Greek island of Kythera, its inhabitants and its culture. With the help of a J. William Fulbright grant, I was able to spend over one calendar year living and photographing on this beautiful island.

Over the years, Kythera has suffered from massive waves of emigration of its people abroad to the point of near depopulation. These mass migrations caused the population of Kythera to drop from about 13,000 at the beginning of the twentieth century to a current mid-winter population of 2,500, leaving entire villages stripped of younger generations and some completely abandoned. To the remaining Kytherians, these deserted homes and communities stand as visual reminders of a society once unified by tradition now transformed by ambitions of a different life abroad.

One Year on Kythera is a contemporary look into the lives of those who have chosen to remain on the island:  what ways they maintain a traditional way of life and in what ways their lifestyles are changing.

I would like to extend my most sincere thanks to the people of Kythera who warmly accepted me into their community, lives, and homes, and to the J. William Fulbright Foundation, whose generous grant made this project possible.”

Enigmas De La Luz En Superficie

Enigmas De La Luz En Superficie
Màrgara De Haene Rosique
Information Available here

FINAL SMALLER

“The images shown here, were made in the photographic emulsion production workshops of Catalina de la Cruz and the artist book’s edition workshop of the artist Carmen Cardemil, both during a research internship which ran April and May 2013 in Santiago, Chili. The book is one of the results of the research project “interpretative keys of the image” which was carried out in the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico.”

Márgara De Haene Rosique – “I travel through my camera hoping to find the precise moment in which the lights finds the surface and produces an image. It is not the objects which attract my eyes, but the imagery created when photographing the occurrence of light in contact with the limits of the world’s physicality; the instantce in which the observed reality is lit makes me consider the quality of light on the surface. On the surface the light slides, flows, travels through the plain that changes in function of its qualities and the journey of my photographic look meets the presence of images that the eye does not perceive at first sight. The surface of the sea becomes skin; the clouds are an ocean; in a silent pond a zigzag is drawn; a wall is a mirage. ”

Carmen Cardemil – “In this book, De Haene uses analogical XIX and XX centuries techniques, generally used for portraits, and, with an accurate intuition, she works with them to print, in the old ways, her uninhabited landscape pictures in which people never appear. In these series, the artist addresses the world. It is a clean world, almost empty of human signs. She looks at it and teaches us to see it as a face. To see the most mysterious and rare of faces. To see the most arduously desired, the most beloved face.”

Catalina De La Cruz – “These photographic images are part of a registry built throughout the years across different journeys. Landscapes that portray diverse geographies, with sea, rivers, clouds, forests, threes and solitary leaves, gorges and rocks, beaches, sand and ice, whose touching point is, seemingly, the expression of pure nature. These are fragments extracted from vast latitudes, which could easily stay within their reality, but end up taking another course.”

La Più Bella Isola Al Mondo

La Più Bella Isola Al Mondo
Ana Zaragoza
Available here

FINAL SMALLER
“Besides the turquoise sea that impresses visitors, there is a secret island where everything is possible, even climbing a ladder to the stars. “La più bella isola al mondo” is the title of a short photobook about the island of Formentera in Spain. This book has been made by the photographer Ana Zaragoza and it has been published with the collaboration of Caravanbook publishing house.”

The River Sherbourne

The River Sherbourne
Jessica Bell
Information Available here

The River Sherbourne by Jessica Bell

“The River Sherbourne runs from outside the City of Coventry at Hawkes End, flowing through the suburban landscape, to the centre where the river is culverted into underground tunnels. The river continues its journey, re-emerging at Far Gosfard Street, where it flows through the land until it joins the River Sowe.

With aims to create a visual representation of the journey of the River Sherbourne, this photobook focuses on the river and its surrounding area as a subject. The photobook challenges social issues such as the interaction of man and nature, and how they try to coexist. Throughout this body of work the presence of the photographer is evident, with the photobook echoing their personal journey of discovery; yet the intrusion of the photographer is not overly dominant, ensuring that space and distance is allowed, permitting each viewer to create their own experience and journey with the River Sherbourne.”

Tree People

Tree People
Ritva Kovalainen and Sanni Seppo
Available here

Tree People by Ritva Kovalainen and Sanni Seppo

“A description of Finnish myths associated with trees and forests. ‘Tree People’ provides a comprehensive picture of the traditional beliefs of our ancestors concerning trees and forests and of the remnants of this tradition that Finns still carry within them. ‘Tree People’ describes what trees can offer people besides game animals and utility articles or raw material for industry.”

Sometimes We Have No Shadow

Sometimes We Have No Shadow
Juan Margolles
Available here

Sometimes We Have No Shadow by Juan Margolles

 “Based on the exploration and contemplation of the vicinity, Sometimes we have no shadow emerged from the personal experience of inhabit an unfamiliar urban space.

Through a leisurely tour without cardinal directions, in the urban environment to which he attempts to belong, Margolles highlights the presence of natural elements over a formal architecture to develop two parallel narratives that build the very same space.

These narratives establish a dialogue beyond the urban form, that reflects a constant personal change and transforms the author from observer to observed.”

Swarm

Swarm
Lukas Felzmann
Available here

Swarm by Lukas Felzmann

Swarm is a breathtaking photographic series exploring the flock movements of migrating birds. The photographs offer a unique view of the beauty but also the complexity and diversity of shape variations. A swarm sitting on the ground mirrors the surface of the earth like a skin, but as soon as it lifts up it becomes a fluid three-dimensional system in constant flux. This aerial ballet reveals a rhythm of upward explosion and downward, cascading movement. At times the forms seem to explode, blooming like flowers or expanding outward like fireworks. At other times they appear more stable, slowly drifting like a negative image of stellar constellations. Swarm looks up into the sky and follows flight through the dynamic landscape of streams of air.”

Views Of Matlock Bath

Views Of Matlock Bath
George Miles
Available here

Views Of Matlock Bath by George Miles

“Views of Matlock Bath consists of large format colour photographs of the landscape around an area of the Derwent Valley in Derbyshire, England. Classifications of landscape representation were cultivated within these views by painters such as Turner and Constable, Joseph Wright and Alexander Cozens. The book developed as part of three year project carried out under the mentorship of renowned American photographer Stephen Shore. George Miles’ contemplative photographs are accompanied by a short history of the area and an introductory essay by artist, curator of and writer Jeremy Millar. The book draws upon a variety of pictorial representations from photography and painting, the valley itself being of great significance in formalising ideas of Landscape as a genre in its own right. George Miles’ sublime large format color photographs explore how the land is used, viewed, and mediated: both physically and through representations of it. The town having bore witness to the consolidation of the English landscape tradition through visiting artists on the Grand Tour, the birth of both the Industrial Revolution, and of mass tourism (the first package holiday organised by Thomas Cook in 1841). These interconnections and the relationship they bear upon how we view the landscape are explored through the sequencing of photographs within the book, setting up a dialectic tension between these opposites presents a contemplative space in which to critically reflect upon how representations of ‘nature’ since the Industrial Revolution have been complicit in the environmental problems we are now currently faced with.”

Northern Gothic

Northern Gothic
Sharon Harvey
Available here

Northern Gothic by Sharon Harvey

“Northern Gothic: Otherworldly and timeless photographs by Sharon Harvey from the forests and woodlands of Yorkshire. Shot with a Pinhole, Holga and Pentax K1000 camera with black and white film. Prints hand developed in the darkroom using experimental techniques. Introduction by Vincent McGovern.”

Out There

Out There
Bruno Augsburger
Available here

Out There

Out There invites the reader on a mythical journey through the wilderness of the Yukon territory. A photographic record of countless escapes by Augsburger in an endless quest to reach freedom. The book is not so much a record of a physical landscape but of an emotional one. In documenting his travels through the snow, the wilderness and the archaic landscapes, the photographer reveals that this is a journey to the basic questions of our existence.”

The Time Of Dreaming The World Awake

The Time Of Dreaming The World Awake
Yvette Monahan
Available here

The Time Of Dreaming The World Awake

The Time of Dreaming the World Awake is a portrait of a place, a landscape of possibility.

This photographic body of work is based in a small region in Southern France. I was drawn there initially by the story of Bugarach, the ‘magic’ mountain. Bugarach was somehow connected to a Mayan prophecy which indicated that the world as we know it, would end on December 21st, 2012. The prophecy claimed that this date would mark the beginning of a new era for humanity, a new and sublime future. Bugarach was to be the first bastion of this modern Arcadia.

I felt that the landscape around Bugarach had a palpable charge and I was compelled to continuously return to photograph it throughout 2012. This idea of a new ideal destiny was appealing as it offered a sense of possibility.It allowed an allegorical landscape full of portents to exist, one that was beyond the visual reality.

In order to access the intangible within the landscape, I engaged my intuition, photographing people and places only when I felt moved to. I used this method of visual enquiry to try and understand the existential nature of this place.

Nothing happened last December, which was to be expected. Despite this, I realised how important it was for me to believe in the possibility of an idyll, even if it only existed in my mind.” – Yvette Monahan

1699

1699
Jim Read
Images Here

1699 by Jim Read

“The initials W.E.H and the date 1699 carved into a lintel stone, now part of a garden wall. It was quarried from the nearby rock strata.

The initials of the quarrymen who worked but hand to extract the stone are not recorded.

Nature has been reclaiming this scarred landscape ever since.”

Birdwatching

Birdwatching
Paula McCartney
Available Here

Bird Watching by Paula McCartney

“A spotted wren perches on the limb of a pine tree in a field of daisies. A song sparrow stands ready to take flight from a snow-covered limb against a winter landscape. For many, these descriptions depict quintessential experiences of nature. As photographs in a bird-watcher’s field journal they become something else entirely. Precious and desirable for being so rare, they transform into a kind of trophy that rewards the bird-watcher for his or her skill, tireless patience, and mastery over nature. At first glance, conceptual artist Paula McCartney’s Bird Watching seems to be a most exemplary specimen of a bird-watching journal. Handwritten notations recording species, location, size, and markings describe well-rendered and flawlessly composed photographs of a wide variety of passerines, or perching birds, in their natural settings in locations across the United States. Page after page of the most wonderfully diverse species of birds are perfectly posed in picturesque natural settings–a bird-watcher’s dream.

On second glance, however, the birds appear a bit too carefully arranged amid the tangle of brush and branches. An even closer look reveals stiff wire protrusions mounting each bird to its perch, matted tufts of overdyed faux feathers forming wings and splashes of paint creating eyes and beaks. McCartney has activated her atmospheric landscapes by adding synthetic decorative birds purchased at craft stores. This startling revelation has you wondering if the artificial might ultimately be more satisfying than the natural. Part document and part fiction, Paula McCartney’s Bird Watching is a fanciful, homespun field guide to a woodland twilight zone where our unconscious need to control nature is indulged and our search for an unattainable ideal natural experience is fulfilled. Featuring a design that mimics the tactility of a real bird-watching journal and including essays by Darius Himes and Karen Irvine, this book will appeal to the dreamy naturalist in all of us.” – from the PA Press Website

Radiata

Radiata
William Horan, Jacob Raupach and Felix Wilson
Available here

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“Radiata Pine (Pinus radiata) is one of the most widely planted trees in forestry plantations globally, yet is listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as endangered. This seemingly paradoxical status highlights the strange relationship that these trees have with human beings, existing between categories of nature and culture, between built and wild environments.

In Radiata, three emerging artists have created a document exploring this relationship through the photographic image. The narrative that emerges is complex and multifaceted, drawing out questions about how we, as humans, perceive and relate to non-human species in the world.”

Bidean

Bidean
Miren Pastor
Available here

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“Once it has reached this point of its journey, the caterpillar gets ready to undergo the profound metamorphosis that will take it from its state of larva to the one of imago, or adult form. Hidden amidst the underbrush, spinning on itself, it has produced a cocoon out of silk thread, that it will use to isolate itself from the outside world. It is then that it all starts to explode. […] Be that as it may, all of the images seem to transmit that the time has come, that a limit has been reached, some kind of scream of Nature cracking open to give birth to a new being.” – Iván del Rey de la Torre”

The publication functions both as a photobook and as an exhibition resource. For that purpose it is necessary to use two unbound books, making use of both the front and back pages and arranging them with the help of the indicated coordinates, to create a wall installation.

Northwestern Wild

Northwestern Wild
Paula Prats
Available here 

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‘In trip to Canada, in a small island near Vancouver, Paula Prats begins a visual narrative story in a subjective way, shooting all the incidents that happen around focusing on elements that make the place unique. Sunbeams through the trees, wooden shelters, the shore and sometimes, the disturbing presence of somebody hiding his face are an example of this enigmatic story Paula tries to show.’ – Bad Weather Press

Natural Collection Submissions

A friendly nudge and reminder that the Photobook Club’s ‘Natural Collection’ is looking to grow out and up with submissions taken not only from established photographers but also from students, graduates, small publishing houses, poets, novelists, illustrators and sculptors. Plus, if you needed an excuse – how about world Photobook Day coming up on the 14th October – a day that not only celebrates the photobook but also recognises Anna Atkins ‘Photographs of British Algae’ as the first of it’s kind – a book that would surely find a suitable home here in the Natural Collection! 
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The collection’s next stop will likely be at the University of Huddersfield 
To donate you can get in contact with Me or Lucy and you can send books to…
The Natural Collection
Matt Johnston
10 Granby Avenue
Harpenden
Herts
AL5 5QR
UK
 
Cheers
Matt

A Small Book of Trees

A Small Book of Trees
Minna Kantonen
Available here

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The trees in Minna Kantonen’s photographs blend in yet do not quite seem to fit within their urban environments. Unnatural nature that fails to fulfill its role as an opposite of culture. Are these trees homeless, or do they create places for themselves as they define open in-between spaces with their presence? Like weeds they fill the gaps that haunt the order, and give us a glimpse of another reality or an alternative way to dwell in a city. They live their own time in the streets, frail and mortal next to the buildings, timeless compared to the constant movement. As silent wittnesses they measure the temporal rhythms of both the individuals and the society. What is the time and space of trees, in relation to us? – Taru Elfving

NATUR

NATUR
Michael Schmidt
Available here 

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In a series of black and white images of the German landscape made between 1987 and 1997, Michael Schmidt has forged a new pictorial language to deconstruct the world he observes. Concerned with light and form, Schmidt’s images contain a wealth of silver tones, a spectrum of rich greys which evolve from light to dark in mystical, imperceptible gradients. But the black and white filter is also a tool that allows Schmidt to neutralise the world, impeding the subjective perception of his viewer. It is through his editorial process, a process of montage, that Schmidt constructs an interior dialect, fashioning a self-contained world within the linear sequence of the book.

Flood Music

Flood Music
Chad Rutter
Available here

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Artist books share characteristics with music. They’re time based experiences. They have a beginning, end, and rhythm created by both the artist and the viewer. They’re repeatable, like a song. Flood Music was made to be a sort of visual musical album, with images in place of lyrics and layout shifts in place of sounds. It could be called traveling music, as it lyrically pulls together moments and places of road trips through Minnesota, Nebraska and Louisiana over the span of a few years.

A Kickstarter project from Mystery Spot Books for a new photobook by Minnesota artist Peter Happel Christian; https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/201829682/things-boulders-ate

Nature’s Nation

Nature’s Nation
Kate Casanova, Caleb Coppock, Paula McCartney, Emily Roehl, Chad Rutter, Lex Thompson, Pamela Valfer
Available here

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Nature’s Nation collects work by seven artists and writers all working with themes of nature and place.

A Kickstarter project from Mystery Spot Books for a new photobook by Minnesota artist Peter Happel Christian; https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/201829682/things-boulders-ate

Scenes From The Great American Non-Site

Scenes From The Great American Non-Site
Chad Rutter
Available here

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Scenes From the Great American Non-Site is a book that looks at the American interstate system as an earthworks piece. The book is comprised of photos of road embankments and rocks collected between New York and San Francisco.

 

A Kickstarter project from Mystery Spot Books for a new photobook by Minnesota artist Peter Happel Christian; https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/201829682/things-boulders-ate

Anthropocène

Anthropocène
Nicolas Guiraud
Available here

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In less than 200 years man has altered life on earth forever. The Anthropocene is the new geological age, an age in which the human species has become the prevailing geophysical force dominating all other natural forces that have hitherto impacted upon the earth.
In geological time (4.5 billion years) 200 years represent a few seconds in the lifespan of a human being. A few decisive seconds. This staggering acceleration in our planet’s evolution suggests that we have passed the tipping point, that humanity’s end has moved suddenly closer, that our biological survival is at stake. For man, nature has always been a kind of creed, God’s shadow on earth. The fact that humanity has become the dominant force for the planet augurs the death of this idea of nature and, paradoxically, dissolves the frontier that has hitherto separated us from the natural world. Ours is now a world rid at last of the very idea of nature; a purely artificial world, innocent, fragile and hazardous. Eden is right here and now. To accept this idea is to accept a kind of serene jubilation before the enigmatic beauty of a world in decay.

Nicolas Guiraud

The Garden

The Garden
Dominika Jackuliaková
Available here

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The Garden is a photographic series that focuses on the relationship between a person and a garden, which can be seen as some sort of artificially created landscape. These photographs were taken in five botanical gardens. The botanical garden is a place that inspires me with its complexity concentrated in one specific area, and that in my understanding takes on a function of a museum. As I take the portraits, I find paralels between the life of a man and the life cycle of the plants through my own feelings. I am looking for indirect significance that plants have in our lives.

In The Company Of An Invisible Man

In The Company Of An Invisible Man
Harry Rose
Available here

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In his body of work, In the Company of an Invisible Man, Harry Rose explores notions of loss, memory and human relationships within landscape photography. Specifically, his work focuses on a particular landscape that has influenced him personally as well as professionally. Having kept his distance from this place for some time, Rose has been drawn back to photograph this landscape, to reflect and find some inner peace. Retracing walks and journeys from countless miles travelled through his youth, Rose guides us through the landscape he photographs giving the audience access to treasures and memories collected along these routes. Through significant objects, rock minerals, childhood photographs, immersing himself back into the environment, Rose explores not individuality but an awareness of self and a search for identity in a key psychological landscape formed from his subjective experiences.

-Kate Mercer

In Bloom

In Bloom
Hannah Platt
Available here

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Moving from winter to spring a transition appears. We say goodbye to the brief dark days and welcome the beginning of opportunity. Amongst all of the green, blossom blooms and outshines, creating instant beauty to its surrounding. Stemming from a personal quest this project touches on the idea of new life and new beginnings through the symbolism of the Cherry Blossom tree. With blossom trees’ ephemeral stay the project captures moments that may be gone tomorrow, a poetic suggestion to appreciate everything in life, don’t let things go by un-noticed.

Hannah Platt

Midwest Dirt

Midwest Dirt
Nathan Pearce (edited by Matt Johnston)
Available here  

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Midwest Dirt is a body of work that tells a story of my mid twenties and my midwest. More than just snapshots from the midwest this project is about a time in my life where I return home after a long absence. The work is about returning home, at the same time longing for where I had been. It’s the feeling of calm and quiet that only my native midwest and those people I love who live there have ever provided me. The themes that I explore will not only intrigue viewers who want to see a glimpse of midwestern american life but anyone who has left home or longed to leave.

Nathan Pearce

Self Publish Riga

Some of the Photobook Club’s Natural Collection travelled to Latvia recently for the fantastic ‘Self Publish Riga’ mini-festival. The event featured talks, a dummy contest and a selection of curated collections including this one.

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Weight and space limits meant that 9 books travelled…

The Line
Palindromo Mészáros

Radiata
Jacob Raupauch

Power Places
Joseph Wilcox 

Autumn River
Philip J Brittan

Northlands
Photography by Elena Ayllon, Illustration by Sakura Sato

Up & Down the Pyrenees
Tim Mitchell

River’s Bisectors
Eugenijus Barzdžius

Kanoa
Maggie Harrsen

The Marshes
Samuel Wright and Josh Lustig 

 

Thoreau

Thoreau
Alessandro Calabrese 
Available here 

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Alessandro Calabrese’s work is the result of an artist residence conducted between 2012 and 2013 in Valle d’Aosta. The serie is inspired by the writings of Henry David Thoreau, especially “Walden, Life in the woods”, a manifesto about the relationship between man and nature which has permeated the entire American culture and environmentalist. Alessandro let his gaze wander in the Natural Park of Mont Avic with great freedom, without establishing rigid hierarchies or obsessive projects, but revealing and surprising us with their sophistication and sensitivity. This is also the reason why the work takes the form of a precious little book, to be read and carefully guard second nature, that speaks of nature and set of men, in a progressive succession of reflections on the concepts of wilderness and human settlement.

– Luca Andreoni

The Oldest Living Things in the World

The Oldest Living Things in the World
Rachel Sussman
Available here

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The Oldest Living Things in the World is an epic journey through time and space. Over the past decade, artist Rachel Sussman has researched, worked with biologists, and traveled the world to photograph continuously living organisms that are 2,000 years old and older. Spanning from Antarctica to Greenland, the Mojave Desert to the Australian Outback, the result is a stunning and unique visual collection of ancient organisms unlike anything that has been created in the arts or sciences before, insightfully and accessibly narrated by Sussman along the way.

Her work is both timeless and timely, and spans disciplines, continents, and millennia. It is underscored by an innate environmentalism and driven by Sussman’s relentless curiosity. She begins at “year zero,” and looks back from there, photographing the past in the present.  These ancient individuals live on every continent and range from Greenlandic lichens that grow only one centimeter a century, to unique desert shrubs in Africa and South America, a predatory fungus in Oregon, Caribbean brain coral, to an 80,000-year-old colony of aspen in Utah. Sussman journeyed to Antarctica to photograph 5,500-year-old moss; Australia for stromatolites, primeval organisms tied to the oxygenation of the planet and the beginnings of life on Earth; and to Tasmania to capture a 43,600-year-old self-propagating shrub that’s the last individual of its kind. Her portraits reveal the living history of our planet—and what we stand to lose in the future. These ancient survivors have weathered millennia in some of the world’s most extreme environments, yet climate change and human encroachment have put many of them in danger. Two of her subjects have already met with untimely deaths by human hands.

Alongside the photographs, Sussman relays fascinating – and sometimes harrowing – tales of her global adventures tracking down her subjects and shares insights from the scientists who research them. The oldest living things in the world are a record and celebration of the past, a call to action in the present, and a barometer of our future.

– University of Chicago Press

Autumn River

Autumn River
Philip J Brittan
Available here 

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Autumn River is a series of images created along the length of the River Frome in the south west of England during the autumn of 2012. The images were made by moving into the flowing water either on foot or by boat. Leaves in the water are reflected and distorted – a mass of intoxicating colours intensified and blurred with movement, trees on the riverbank viewed through a pink and orange haze.

– Philip J Brittan

Somewhere Else

Somewhere Else
Stephanie Noritz
Available here

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Somewhere Else is the first solo book from photographer Stephanie Noritz. With landscape at the forefront, the project marks a definitive shift from the photographer’s portraiture, while maintaining the characteristic elegance and intimacy that has defined her previous work. Shot across the Western Hemisphere, spanning from Central America to the American West and Northeast, Somewhere Else is a jaunt into the essence of place and form. The photographs evoke the subdued simplicity and order that unify locations separated by thousands of miles. The images are defined by a delicate aura of seclusion, drawing the viewer into a place that is at once immense and contemplative.

– Chris Lee

Sentinel in Sight

Sentinel in Sight
Michael C Rael
Available here

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Said to be the largest “free-standing” mountain (not part of any mountain chain) in the continental United States, San Antonio Mountain rises dramatically near the Colorado/New Mexico border. Residents of the vast San Luis Valley in Colorado have exceptional views of San Antonio Mountain, and photographer Michael C. Rael documents the varied ways in which San Antonio Mountain can be seen. Presented over the course of four seasons, Rael’s photographs all have the mountain in the frame, not always as the main subject, but always as the overarching theme.

The Line

The Line
Palindromo Mészáros
Available here

MJ: A powerfully visual representation of a tragic occurrence, the line does not discriminate or avoid, it’s cuts through landscapes that require a double take for at first this addition of colour seems quite intentional and beautiful.

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4th of October, 2010 at 12.25pm in Ajka, Veszprém county, Hungary: around a million cubic meters of toxic waste were released after the rupture of the retaining wall in one of the reservoirs used for the accumulation of MAL aluminum company trash. The spill reached two meters high and started a destructive race trying to release its energy, flooding the nearby Devecser and Kolontár villages. Ten human casualties were counted and material damages were impossible to measure, including the destruction or irreparable deterioration of numerous houses, the disappearance of infrastructures and the poisoning of dozens of fields. The accident was at first sight considered the biggest catastrophe of Hungarian history.

These photos have been taken six months after the accident when silence takes place of the headlines, and just The Line is left.

Flood of Sunshine

Flood of Sunshine
Al Palmer
Available here 

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Flood of Sunshine is a study of the relationship between the built landscape and the organic forms that exist in between the architecture. The contrast between the grey Brutalist architecture and white snow initially makes the viewer assume that the photographs are black and white, in reality they are colour images. The dichotomy of the man-made and the nature gives the photographs both tension and harmony.

– Al Palmer

 

Northlands

Northlands
Photography by Elena Ayllon, Illustration by Sakura Sato
Information here 

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Northlands is a little zine about the mountains and snow. The project started when J. moved for work to the north of the country in midwinter. A life between the big city and the mountains in the Basque country began.

You can find my work in the snow with a 35mm camera and a special collaboration with Japanese artist Sakura Sato.

– Elena Ayllon

Power Places

Power Places
Joseph Wilcox
Available here 

MJ: Man’s impact and insignificance in relation to the natural landscape is played out here in a well sequenced and soft-toned set of images.

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The word Huldufólk translates to hidden people, who are said to inhabit the lava fields, stone piles, boulders, and hills of Iceland. These enchanted spots are called Álagablettur, or power places, and they offer the secretive and dark landscape the Huldufólk require. Tales point to the Huldufólk protecting humans who respect their domain. But they are also territorial, and are known to defend their homes from human intrusion. The Álagablettur of Iceland are places of an ancient struggle. These photos are a documentation, a record of what remains of history, and the proof of the Huldufólk’s continuing legacy.

– Joseph Wilcox

Up & Down the Pyrenees

Up & Down the Pyrenees
Tim Mitchell
Available here

MJ: Mitchell eludes in his introduction to the lost art of sustainability as he wild camps with friend David in the Pyrenees, raising money for charity, this notion is supported with a simple but effectively designed book and vegetable ink prints.

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Up & Down the Pyrenees
A visual meditation on scale, topography and altitude in the High Pyrenees.

In summer 2011 I joined David Lintern for 150 miles of his 600 mile charity walk from sea to sea along
the High Pyrenees. This book is an attempt to convey a sense of that journey.

Self-published, May 2013
Paperback photobook
28 pages / 28 photographs
Staple-bound, 14cm x 21cm
Numbered edition of 100

Designed by Brighten the Corners www.brightenthecorners.com. Printed by the world’s first zero waste print company on 100% recycled paper using vegetable based inks. www.seacourt.net

All profits from the book will be split between charities,
John Muir Trust & Soundmix

– Tim Mitchell

The Young Earth

The Young Earth
Jordan Sullivan
Available here

MJ: The natural landscape of Iceland acts here not as a main character but a stage on which Sullivan is directing his young characters. This said the stage reacts to the scenes and the scenes to the emotions of the narrative which is at times turbulent and others meditative.

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The Young Earth is a fictional photo series and accompanying photo-text novella set in Iceland. Shot on 35mm and polaroid, the story follows two Americans in the last days of their twenties, one of them terminally ill, as they explore one of the youngest bodies of land in the world. The men immerse themselves in the idyllic and remote corners of the Icelandic countryside (a place completely foreign to both men), where they are forced to confront their own mortality and a past love triangle that briefly disrupted their friendship.

Through meditations on death, the loss of youth, and the beauty and complications that come with love and friendship, The Young Earth explores how two men attempt to move on and find courage and calm in the face of oncoming tragedy.

The Young Earth is the first volume of Sullivan’s Wandering Days book series

– Jordan Sullivan

We Make the Path by Walking

We Make the Path by Walking
Paul Gaffney
Available here

MJ: An understated and ultimately warming book on walking as a mode of transport and mode of meditation. Comparisons with The Pond are perhaps inevitable with the subject matter and considered image making but this is no homage and should be seen in it’s own right. The world Gaffney choses to frame each time he makes an image seems significant, relevant to us and our journey yet soon it slips to the back of the mind and we carry on with a feeling, a memory, rather than an indelible imprint on our mind.

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During 2012 I walked over 3,500 kilometres with the aim of creating a body of work which would explore the idea of walking as a form of meditation and personal transformation.

My intention was to create a series of quiet, meditative images, which would evoke the experience of being immersed in nature and capture the essence of the journey. The images seek to engage the viewer in this walk, and to communicate a sense of the subtle internal and psychological changes which one may undergo while negotiating the landscape.

– Paul Gaffney

Livingston County

Livingston County, Photographs 2006-2010
Jonathan Lipkin
Available here 

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The small towns of Geneseo, York, Piffard and Cuylerville in Western New York are home to salt miners, farmers, and other workers. Livingston County explores the physical and psychological environment of these men and women. While only forty minutes from downtown Rochester, these towns are semi-rural in character, although there is little unused land. Mostly one can see cornfields, small houses and shopping malls. In spite of the relatively high population density, there is a sense of isolation in these small towns, and people gather in bars and sportsmen’s clubs, homes and restaurants.

What I found is a complicated blend of aggression and tenderness, compassion and brutality, as I was greeted open arms and a wariness that befit my status as an outsider.

– Jonathan Lipkin

River’s Bisectors

River’s Bisectors
Eugenijus Barzdžius
Available here

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One of the curious stories that comes along with whole project, that I have done it while studying at University of Wales, Newport (Last year it was rebranded to South Wales). It took me for several weeks actively think about that peace of a map that I received as geographical boundaries for my project. The rest was up to me: to come up with any idea or proposal. When I crystallised my idea of taking river straights and drawing them into an average straight, and when two straights were meeting, they are creating geometrically measurable angle, from which a bisector can be extended to the nearest road and by this way creating a vantage point.

So I was trying to explain this idea for 1,5 hour for my tutor – Paul Reas in front of our course group, who said that I am keeping the longest debate record for one’s idea in University of Wales. And I must not only be thankful for his attentive listening and that showed will to understand, even though it was quite a challenge for him at the beginning. But he continued to question my idea like a coach for an athlete trying to find weak muscles with a wish of better results. So he actually let me work on my idea with no further assistance. But when he saw the book he was pleasantly surprised and it was very well evaluated among other academic staff. And also rumours about that long discussion went on for more than a year among younger colleagues.

– Eugenijus Barzdžius 

Infertile Grounds

Infertile Grounds
Sandra Vitaljic
Available here

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The photographs from the Infertile Grounds series are marked by trauma, historical events and human experience. the locations in the photographs are not just beautiful landscapes but sites that have strong symbolism due to their historical context and the fact that they have, in one way or another, formed the national identity of croatia. Woods, fields and rivers are part of folk tales and myths, but have also become part of a rhetoric legitimising political systems and ideologies. The meaning of many events and sites have changed due to altered circumstances, regardless of the fact that the place, even with human intervention, has remained the same, bare and similar to other places where nothing important has ever happened.

– Sandra Vitaljic

The Marshes

The Marshes
Samuel Wright and Josh Lustig
Available here

MJ: Certainly a book that deserves a thorough reading, images and text partner here for both an exploration of wilderness and a space that provides the setting for numerous stories like that of Bobby and Jay. Neither prose nor imagery distract from the other but neither do they seek to form any strong links – plenty for the reader to do.

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Hackney Marshes are city and wilderness. They are wild and grubby, empty and teeming with rubbish and stories. ‘The Marshes’ brings together images by Josh Lustig and text by Samuel Wright, in an unconventional design that lets the photographs and writing interact and interweave throughout. As sprawling and untamed as its subject, this is a book designed to be explored, played with, and re-read.

“Sometimes something would catch fire inside them and they’d run like dogs, in huge looping curves over the brown grass, screaming.”

The Marshes’ is the first publication from Tartaruga Press, available in a strictly limited pressing of 300 numbered copies only.

“On quiet evenings, when the birds pause, and the traffic stops, and the boy next door turns off his Xbox, I can hear it rotting.”

– Josh Lustig and Samuel Wright